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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
mal-esso lens. >> who is write, president obama or senator fienstein? >> they are both right. and i'm not kidding. let me say first it's a pleasure to be an al jazeera america. you bring new content and energy to the business. i'm pleased to be on the program. as for who is right and why they are both right, it's true that core al qaeda has been decimated. al qaeda as a top-down organization is over. al qaeda and related terror groups - they are parasitically related in a horizontal way is growing. what mike rogers is saying is that the threats have changed. what diane is saying is that they have increased. >> let's listening to house intelligence chair mike rogers, who suggested the situation may be worse than before 9/11, 2001. >> the pressure on intelligence services to great it right is stronger. more affiliates than we have had have switched to the notion that smaller events are okay. if you have more smaller events, that may lead to their objectives and goals. >> representative rogers brings up the issue of smaller events. do you think that's where we are going, instead of big
zuma announced the passing of nelson mandela to south africa and the world that president obama took to the briefing room to talk about his reminiscenses and everything that nelson mandela meant to him. some time in the evening, you are right. the president placed a phone call to jacob zuma. he expressed condolences from himself and michelle obama. he called nelson mandela a man of kindness and humility, influencing his own life, and the president only met nelson mandela one time as a senator. he had visited south africa twice, once as a senator and once this past june with his family, unable to meet the ailing nelson mandela at this point. the president took to the briefing room, talked about the inspiration that nelson mandela was for him, talked about the anecdote. nelson mandela and a struggle against apartheid, inspired president obama as a student in the late '70s, and early '80s, to become involved in politics for the first time. let's listen to what obama had to say. >> we will not see the likes of nelson mandela again. it falls to us as best we can for the example that we se
of your left pocket to put it in your right pocket, you are somehow richer. >> it didn't work in 2008 and didn't work for obama in 2009. it didn't work for hoover and roosevelt in the '30s. borrow money from the private sector and had the government spend it, you don't create more wealth. you are simply increasing the burden of government spending. i actually agree with david. i don't worry a lot about deficits but where we would disagree is i think government spending diverts resources for more productive uses as well as things like food stamps and disabilities, you create dependency and lure people into this trap of relying on the government and they lose their self esteem. they lose their ability to contribute to the economy. again, all we have to do is look at the mess in europe to see where that path takes us. and what worries me about obama is we are not going to deal with inincome ine quiltty and mobility unless we take the chains of government off of the economy. >> let's take talk about these mixed signs on the disney. consumer confidence is down. but on the other hand, it lo
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)